LINK App: Send-and-File to DMS

We are receiving more and more requests to Send-and-File to iManage and NetDocuments. Our LINK app has done this for years.

Filing email to DMS is becoming important from a governance perspective. Not only do law firms want emails to be accessible in DMS with the Matter. But some law firms want to reduce the risk of years of email in Outlook. One of our law firm customers deletes all email at the 90-day mark. Truly. Another firm archives all email after 90 days. Retrieving email from the archive is possible but time-consuming. Therefore, filing to DMS becomes more attractive to attorneys.

Even without such law firm email policies, filing email to the Matter is increasing. The key is that is filing to DMS needs to be easy.

But Send-and-File on mobile devices is rare. It requires a tight integration of DMS and Email, as well as comprehensive security to protect confidential client data. LINK provides both the easy workflow and the security. Draft the email, tap Send, then tap a Recommended, Recent, or DMS folder to file.

LINK has predictive filing, too. LINK learns where you file a certain correspondent’s email and will show you Recommended, Recent, and DMS folders. In many cases you can file to one of these folders with a single tap.

New in LINK, the attorney can now go to the LINK email settings to turn Send-and-File on or off by default. The attorney can also toggle Send-and-File off and on, per individual email by tapping the envelope icon in draft email. When the envelope is green, Send-and-File is on.

Send and File Setting in LINK

Watch this brief video to see all of LINK’s Send-and-File features.

If you have questions, just write to us at: contact at mobilehelix.com. We’re ready to help you.

Learn more about LINK’s encryption, authentication, and secure container in this 5-minute video: LINK’s Security and Data Protection.

-Maureen

LINK App: New Safari Button

Here is a great new feature in LINK which I use several times a day. When you open a web page in the LINK app using LINK’s browser, you can now tap the familiar Safari button to open the page in the device’s Safari browser.

You can open a link in an email, or in a document, or from an application page, then tap the Safari button to open the page outside of LINK. Here is an example.

Tap on link in Email
Opens in LINK’s browser
Tap Safari Button
Opens in Safari
Tap on “Link” to return to LINK app

I use the Safari button when I receive a link to an uncommon video conference or signature service (we test the popular ones in the LINK browser), or when a page is not rendering correctly. I also use the Safari button when I want to read something, but not now. I open it in Safari. It stays open in Safari. Then I can go back to LINK and continue working.

Sound good? Here are other benefits of the Safari button:

  1. Safari is where you do your personal browsing. If you are logged in to nytimes.com, for example, those cookies are cached in Safari. If you click a hyperlink in Link, your cookies/password manager are not available to you. Better to just browse in Safari.
  2. The LINK browser routes all traffic through your office network. The Safari button allows you to move all personal web browsing into your personal browser. This (a) keeps your work network safe, and (b) prevents web proxies that your company establishes from intercepting and monitoring your traffic. It is a simple matter of employee privacy – you should always have the ability to keep your personal business personal.
  3. Native Safari has special capabilities that LINK does not. In particular, Safari has knowledge of all the apps on your device and many sites will use this capability to automatically launch a mobile app, rather than continuing to view a website in the browser. Safari also has a few important features that are not implemented in LINK’s browser. Chief amongst them is WebRTC, which is a protocol for real-time applications like in-browser video conferencing.
  4. IT can control when Link automatically pushes hyperlinks clicked in email to the native Safari browser. For example, IT can configure Facebook links to automatically open in Safari outside of the LINK container.

Have any questions? Let me know at contact@mobilehelix.com.

-Maureen

Who is putting security at risk? It might be your CXOs…

A new report from MobileIron, “Trouble at the Top,” is eye-popping, although perhaps not surprising to IT professionals. In fact, it might provide very helpful data in making your case for security policies within your organization.

Between February and March 2020 Vanson Bourne interviewed 300 enterprise IT decision-makers and 50 C-level executives in Europe, UK, and the US regarding their organizations’ mobile security protocols.

C-Suite executives are highly targeted for cybersecurity attacks, including phishing.

Yet “76% of C-level executives admitted to requesting to bypass one or more of their organization’s security protocols” during the last year, per the findings.

In a note of irony for IT professionals, “Almost three in four (72%) IT decision-makers also claimed the C-suite is the most likely to forget or need help with resetting their passwords,” writes ZDNet, quoting from the MobileIron study.

MobileIron’s overall point is that employees need the right tools to be secure and productive at the same time. Or, as we would say, security measures cannot afford to impair usability or people will conjure up a way around them.

There is much more in the study. You can register for the download of MobileIron’s “Trouble at the Top” report here.

-Maureen

ILTA Webinar: Mobile, Secure NetDocuments Workflows: NetDocuments® DMS + LINK Encrypted App

Do you use NetDocuments® DMS today or are you evaluating NetDocuments? If you are looking for an encrypted container app approach for mobile NetDocuments DMS, our LINK app may provide that extra client-side security that you are looking for.

Date and time: Monday, February 11, 2019, Noon EST

Watch a recording of the demo here

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Hacking is a booming business, and it’s time for a disruption – CSO Online

By Mobile Helix CEO and Co-founder, Seth Hallem

Hackers are siphoning billions from the global economy each year by stealing data for profit. However, in spite of this rising threat, enterprises continue to make the same mistakes over and over again. It is time to change our assumptions and to re-think how we protect sensitive data.

Hacking is a booming business. Business has been good for several years now. Data breaches are at all-time highs. Cyber-attacks are skyrocketing, and ransomware is a growing fad. And the best news of all is that the same old tricks (see XSS, SQL Injection, SPAM ….) are still working just as well as they always have. How is it possible that a business that was estimated to cost the global economy $450 billion dollars is continuing to grow? That is a lot of money diverted to criminals in lieu of legitimate participants in our global economy.

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What CISOs must learn from Bitcoin and a research team at Georgia Tech

By Seth Hallem, originally published in HelpNetSecurity, Sept. 16, 2013

It has been an eventful time in the mobile world with two recent breaking stories revealing vulnerabilities in the security infrastructure for Android and iOS respectively. While vastly different in their nature, both point to a fundamental lesson that CISOs in an increasingly mobile world cannot ignore – when it comes to encryption, read the fine print. Otherwise you may find yourself up the proverbial creek without a paddle (i.e., remediation strategy).

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Passing Through U.S. Customs and Border Patrol with Your Smartphone? LINK App to the Rescue!

Peripatetic lawyers, take note from Friday, 1/5/2018, in the Washington Post:

“U.S. customs agents conducted 60 percent more searches of travelers’ cellphones, laptops and other electronic devices during the government’s 2017 fiscal year, according to statistics released Friday by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

The agency said it searched 30,200 devices but the inspections affected only 0.007 percent of the 397 million travelers — including American citizens as well as foreign visitors — who arrived from abroad during the 12-month period that ended Sept 30.”1

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The FBI Cracks the iPhone – What Can Legal IT Do? From Mobile Helix CEO

By Seth Hallem, Mobile Helix CEO and co-founder

LegalIT Insider logoOn March 28th, the Department of Justice confirmed that it had successfully unlocked the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone 5C without Apple’s assistance. On that same day, the US government moved to vacate a California court order that had attempted to force Apple to assist in the decryption of the device. While the legal maneuverings are fascinating in their own right, the conclusion leads to an even more fascinating technology discussion – how did the FBI crack the iPhone, and what are the implications of this successful hack? Continue reading