Protect Your Data in a Remote Work Environment – ILTA Educational Webinar

Working remotely became a neccessity almost overnight. But were firm architectures ready? Two common entry points to system hacks, social engineering and network vulnerabilities, threaten the security of remote working. In this session, Mobile Helix CEO and Chief Architect, Seth Hallem, will describe these vulnerabilities and propose practical and actionable ways to address these weaknesses using safe browsing, network proxies, authentication, authorization, and DLP. These mitigations apply to both desktop and mobile devices.

This is an ILTA Educational Webinar. It is free to members as well as to non-members as part of ILTA’s COVID-19 content. Non-members may register for a free login-in.

WATCH THE RECORDED WEBINAR HERE

Outline:

I. Social engineering: Phishing, “Water Hole,” SIM card swaps

   Mitigations including:

    A. Safe browsing

    B. No SMS

    C. Web filtering via proxying

    D. Data Loss Prevention (DLP): printing, recipient checking, metadata filtering

II. Network vulnerabilities

    Mitigations including:

    A. Layered security

    B. Filter – proxy

    C. Authenticate the source – certificates, IP fencing, DoS defense

    D. Authenticate the user – AD credentials, complex passwords, SSO

    E. Authorize – manage email attachments

III. Example of a secure architecture

We welcome you and your questions on June 10th.

Write to us at: contact@mobilehelix dot com.

-Maureen

Is Your Email Vulnerable? Ask the Chinese Military

Image: ribkhan, Pixabay

I’m a current events junkie. I’ll admit it. And I work with law firms. Thus, my favorite podcast? “Stay Tuned with Preet.” Yes, this is Preet Bharara, the former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. Check out an episode. Preet takes a few questions about the law at the beginning of each episode. Then he has a guest. Preet is not only smart, but surprisingly personable. It’s a fast-moving hour.

A recent guest was John P. Carlin, former Assistant Attorney General for the National Security Division at the Department of Justice and Chief of Staff to Robert Mueller at the FBI. He is currently a partner with Morrison & Foerster. Carlin is an international cybersecurity expert.

One of the things which caught my attention in this episode was Carlin’s story of the US subsidiary of a German company whose data was stolen by hackers in the Chinese military. The company, SolarWorld, in Hillsboro, Oregon, made solar energy components.

How was the data stolen? Email. Carlin said, “Email. It is the least protected part of the system, usually. Not like Intellectual Property which is encrypted or where special measures are taken to protect it. They stole email traffic.”

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CodeX FutureLaw 2018 Conference – Innovation Under the Redwoods

Last week I attended the sixth annual CodeX FutureLaw Conference, under the canopy of the redwoods on the Stanford University campus. I did not know entirely what to expect, but as my office is a few miles down El Camino Real from Stanford, I thought that it was worth investigating. I found the event to be stimulating and I would like to share what I  learned so that others may consider attending FutureLaw in the future.

What is CodeX? It is a Stanford group, associated with the Law School, whose mission is to create legal technology that empowers all parties. It is ably headed up by Dr. Roland Vogl.

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Passing Through U.S. Customs and Border Patrol with Your Smartphone? LINK App to the Rescue!

Peripatetic lawyers, take note from Friday, 1/5/2018, in the Washington Post:

“U.S. customs agents conducted 60 percent more searches of travelers’ cellphones, laptops and other electronic devices during the government’s 2017 fiscal year, according to statistics released Friday by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

The agency said it searched 30,200 devices but the inspections affected only 0.007 percent of the 397 million travelers — including American citizens as well as foreign visitors — who arrived from abroad during the 12-month period that ended Sept 30.”1

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ABA Webinar: Lawyers, Do It All with Your iPad

How to Drop the Laptop and Work from your iPad or iPhone

Join us on January 24th for this ABA Legal Technology Resource Center Webinar

Watch the recorded webinar HERE

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Mobile Helix CEO, Seth Hallem, talks with Ari Kaplan about Lawyers & Mobility

 

AriKaplan_Headshot2.jpg

Ari Kaplan

Ari Kaplan spoke with our CEO and co-founder, Seth Hallem.

They discussed the genesis of Mobile Helix, how the LINK app empowers lawyers on the go, the crossroads of usability and security in mobile apps, and our partnerships with iManage®, NetDocuments® and Handshake Software®.

Listen to Ari and Seth in this 12 minute podcast.

Or, download the transcript here.

Surface Pro v. iPad: 3 Legal Mobility Insights from the ILTA Technology Survey

cycling crop -813890_960_720 Pixabay

Each December the International Legal Technology Association (ILTA) publishes their tour de force Technology Survey. Where BlackBerries were indispensable, iPhones dominate and iPads are nearly ubiquitous – but the Legal mobility scenario is dynamic. Here’s a look at three charts from the survey.

Microsoft Surface Pro – Making a Run for It 

Is it a bird, is it a plane? Is a Surface Pro a tablet or a notebook PC? Whatever you call it, the Surface Pro is on the radar in Legal now.

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Biggest Challenge: Security Management – 2015 ILTA Technology Purchasing Survey

The 10th Annual 2015 ILTA / InsideLegal Technology Purchasing Survey was released at ILTACON last week. It’s a quick read and I recommend taking a look at the entire report.

As an introduction to the tech survey, I’ve highlighted the five points that I found most interesting and indicative of our times.

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Enterprise: Time to Get Onboard, “Mobile is Eating the World”

Photo: Charles Forerunner/Unsplash

Photo: Charles Forerunner/Unsplash

Inspired by data from “Mobile is Eating the World” by Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz venture capital firm, aka A16Z. 

Smartphones and the software which runs on them are changing everything we do. How we take photos has radically changed. We pay for lunch with our phones and order groceries from an app. It’s easy and efficient.

I am interested in enterprise mobility. Some of the data in “Mobile is Eating the World” should be a wake-up call to businesses. Below, marked with bullets, I have cited a few data points from “Mobile is Eating the World.” My thoughts on enterprise mobility are in blue font.

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The Law Firm of the Future – Will There be Robots?

head-376942__180 green pixabayFollowers of technology know that AI (Artificial Intelligence) and the invasion of the robots is a trending topic. One of the themes is that the robots are coming and they are going to take all of our jobs. Venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen, not a fan of the “sky is falling” thinking, tends to tweet humorous quips about the looming robot crisis.

On March 6th, when the latest employment data were released, Andreessen tweeted the chart below with the comment, “The robots are really dropping the ball.”

FRED Employment Data

A few days earlier I had attended a panel on “The Law Firm of the Future” sponsored by CodeX and the Palo Alto Area Bar Association. CodeX is a multidisciplinary laboratory operated by Stanford Law School and the Stanford CS Department.

The arc of the meeting was set by the first speaker, Vivek Wadhwa, who presented research on the results of IBM’s Watson AI Engine in diagnosing cancer. Watson’s successful diagnosis rate for lung cancer is 90 percent, compared to 50 percent for human doctors. Wadha’s position is that an AI engine can easily store the entirety of legal case data and can be trained to make legal decisions, perhaps to make even better decisions than humans, also known as lawyers. This is a challenging stance for many of us to grapple with today.

However, in the audience the General Counsel of a local university made the point that their university frequently hires outside counsel. He routinely inquires as to the likely outcome of the case and what will it cost. The answers which he gets are along the lines of, “my gut tells me X.” The GC made the point, “If Watson or AI can provide better answers to those questions, I’m all for it.”

Other panelists illustrated how their organizations combined the strengths of man and machine in order to practice law more efficiently and predictably.

Attorney Natalie Pierce of Littler Mendelson P.C. presented their CaseSmart litigation management and analytics solution. Littler specializes in employment and labor law. Built into CaseSmart is their data from tens of thousands of their cases. In essence, they have data pertaining to case type, jurisdiction, judge, and opposing counsel, therefore, they can provide the odds of outcome and cost of a pending case.

Litigator Ray Gallo, principal of Gallo LLP and Gallo Digital, showed how human skills plus technology can expand a practice. Gallo has won more than 85% of his cases which were brought to verdict, demonstrating exceptional skills. But one person does not scale. He developed a way to use internet technology to support class action and mass action suits. These particular suits would not have been economically viable without automation of data collection and client communication. In doing so, Galli has won judgements for many plaintiffs who would otherwise have been unrepresented.

Another panelist, Derek Bluford, is the President and CEO of QuickLegal, which is an online and yes, mobile app, legal advice service. QuickLegal connects clients with lawyers via audio and video chat. Service is immediate – Derek pointed out that if one is in a car wreck or arrested, one needs help then and there. On the other side of the coin, there are many attorneys who don’t want to be tied to a desk 50 hours a week. They want to have more freedom and flexibility. Therefore, QuickLegal is an efficient market for highly qualified professionals and clients.

When I engage with the law firm of the future, will I pick up an app and be interviewed by an operating system, who will then exchange data with the opposing party’s OS? Will the two systems then calculate the outcome based on precedence? Probably not in my lifetime. Certainly, however, we can already see the big gains to be made by Business Intelligence, software supported client communications, and mobile apps. The changes in legal are well underway.

Kudos to PAABA President, Roger Royse, for putting together a diverse and interesting panel at CodeX.

–Maureen Blando

I tweet at @mobilehelix