Mobile Document Review with the LINK Viewer

For easy and secure document review, we have integrated our own document viewer in our LINK app. When you tap on a document name in LINK, it automatically opens in the LINK document viewer. LINK renders all documents as a PDF for high fidelity to the original. If there are Tracked Changes or redlines in the document, they are rendered as well. Or, you can elect to accept them and view a clean copy of the document.

The LINK viewer provides these essential features:

  • Annotate in the LINK viewer: highlight, underline, strike through, and much more, including irreversible redaction; select colors, opacity, thickness; Apple Pencil is supported
  • Split screen view – view two documents, two versions, or an email and a document side-by-side
  • Indices of: document outline/edits, annotations, and bookmarks
  • Bookmark a page and name the bookmark
  • Thumbnails
  • Continuous scroll
  • Search by term
  • Go to a page number
  • View one page up or two pages up
  • Rotate the page orientation

You may view a document in DMS (content management), an email attachment, or a document saved to My Files local, encrypted storage in LINK.

After you have reviewed, and possibly marked up, your document, you then have these quick options:

  • Check-in to your DMS or content management system
  • Email to a colleague or client
  • Save to My Files, the encrypted local storage in LINK
  • Air Print

You can access your documents, review, and annotate them in a single app – LINK.

Learn about new LINK features and webinars by subscribing to our blog at the “Follow Mobile Helix Blog” button.

Maureen

See our LINK App at iManage ConnectLive 2019, Times Square

iManage ConnectLive 2019 Proud Sponsor

We are thrilled to be a sponsor of ConnectLive for the 4th year!

May 7-8, Marriott Marquis, Times Square – Agenda & Registration here

To arrange a time for a demo or meeting at ConnectLive, write to us at contact@mobilehelix.com

With LINK, attorneys and staff work in one secure environment. LINK gives you full access to iManage, email, and the intranet. Search, annotate, compare, check-in, and email documents in one trusted app.

Register now. With the density of law firms in mid-town Manhattan, it could be a blow-out. See you in Times Square!

LINK in-app email, document comparison, and annotation
LINK in-app email, document comparison, and annotation
LINK by Mobile Helix logo


Is Your Email Vulnerable? Ask the Chinese Military

Image: ribkhan, Pixabay

I’m a current events junkie. I’ll admit it. And I work with law firms. Thus, my favorite podcast? “Stay Tuned with Preet.” Yes, this is Preet Bharara, the former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. Check out an episode. Preet takes a few questions about the law at the beginning of each episode. Then he has a guest. Preet is not only smart, but surprisingly personable. It’s a fast-moving hour.

A recent guest was John P. Carlin, former Assistant Attorney General for the National Security Division at the Department of Justice and Chief of Staff to Robert Mueller at the FBI. He is currently a partner with Morrison & Foerster. Carlin is an international cybersecurity expert.

One of the things which caught my attention in this episode was Carlin’s story of the US subsidiary of a German company whose data was stolen by hackers in the Chinese military. The company, SolarWorld, in Hillsboro, Oregon, made solar energy components.

How was the data stolen? Email. Carlin said, “Email. It is the least protected part of the system, usually. Not like Intellectual Property which is encrypted or where special measures are taken to protect it. They stole email traffic.”

Continue reading

Our CEO in CSO: Ripped from the headlines – are your messages secure in these encrypted apps?

In the investigations of Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen, the FBI has retrieved messages from Signal, Telegram and WhatsApp. While there are weaknesses inherent in all of these apps, the question remains: What does a good data protection scheme look like?

 

A few days ago, the FBI revealed that Michael Cohen’s messages sent with Signal and WhatsApp are now available as evidence in the on-going investigation into his various dealings. While thousands of emails and documents have already been recovered from Cohen’s devices, home, hotel room, and office, the recovery of data from messaging apps that promise end-to-end encryption is surprising. One would presume that end-to-end message encryption should ensure that those messages are unrecoverable without assistance from Mr. Cohen. However, clearly that is not the case.

Continue reading

Secure Email is Cracked; What Now?

cracked pixabay rotated broken-glass-2208593__480

By Seth Hallem, Moble Helix CEO, Co-founder, & Chief Architect

Secure email using S/MIME and OpenPGP is fundamentally broken. Our CEO explains the EFAIL vulnerability and why our LINK Email is not susceptible to EFAIL. What do we do next to protect email? 

On Sunday night, a team of researchers from Germany and Belgium dropped a major bomb on the world of encrypted email by describing a simple, widely applicable, and wildly effective technique for coercing email clients to release encrypted email contents through “Exfiltration channels.”[1] The concept is simple – by using a combination of known manipulation techniques against the encryption algorithms specified in the S/MIME and OpenPGP standards and lax security choices in a wide variety of email clients, the research team was able to intercept and manipulate encrypted emails such that large blocks of the encrypted text are revealed to a malicious server.

What is most brilliant (and most dangerous) about this attack, is that the attack does not require decrypting the email messages or stealing encryption keys. Hence, the attack can be deployed as a man-in-the-middle attack on the infrastructure of the internet itself, rather than requiring that a specific email server or email client is compromised.

The essential idea behind this attack is simple – HTML emails expose a variety of reasons to query remote servers to load parts of those emails. The simplest (and most common) example of this concept is displaying embedded images. Many marketing emails use tiny embedded images to monitor who has opened an email. This technique is so pervasive that many of us have become desensitized to clicking the “Allow images from this sender” prompt in Outlook. It is common practice for marketing emails to contain embedded images with essential content, which encourages users to allow the client to load all images in that message. However, doing so loads both visible images and tiny, single pixel images that marketing tools use to uniquely determine that we have opened the email message in question.

Continue reading