Is Your Data Safe? The Challenge of Client-side Security for Law Firms

Our CEO, Seth Hallem, spoke at the NetDocuments executive summit, ndElevate 2017, on May 23rd.

Seth’s presentation focused on three actionable ways for law firms, and any enterprise, to protect client-side data. We are sharing his slides from ndElevate below. If you have any comments or questions, we’d welcome hearing from you. Please write to contact at mobilehelix.com.

Thank you to NetDocuments for an excellent summit!

 

 

Mobile Helix CEO to Speak at ndElevate 2017 – NetDocuments Executive Summit

ndElevate 2017

Seth Hallem 2017-05-04 Mobile Helix

Mobile Helix CEO and co-founder, Seth Hallem, is a subject matter expert on mobile security. Seth will speak at ndElevate on: 

The Challenge of Client-side Mobile Security for Law Firms 

Tuesday, 5/23/17, 4:00 PM

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ILTA Roadshow Headed to Pittsburgh Nov. 2 – Mobile Helix

ILTA Roadshow Pittsburgh-2 Nov-2-2016.png

Mobile Apps – User Experience and Security

Can your lawyers work with iManage®, NetDocuments, SharePoint and the firm intranet from smartphones and tablets? Mobility for lawyers lives at the challenging crossroads of ease-of-use and security. We’ll look at top solutions used in legal today, covering topics including:

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Join our ILTA Roadshow in Washington, DC, Sept. 13th – Mobile Helix

ILTA Roadshow 2016 Washington DC.png

Mobile Apps – User Experience and Security

Can your lawyers work with iManage®, NetDocuments, SharePoint and the firm intranet from smartphones and tablets? Mobility for lawyers lives at the challenging crossroads of ease-of-use and security. We’ll look at top solutions used in legal today, covering topics including:

Continue reading

The FBI Cracks the iPhone – What Can Legal IT Do? From Mobile Helix CEO

By Seth Hallem, Mobile Helix CEO and co-founder

LegalIT Insider logoOn March 28th, the Department of Justice confirmed that it had successfully unlocked the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone 5C without Apple’s assistance. On that same day, the US government moved to vacate a California court order that had attempted to force Apple to assist in the decryption of the device. While the legal maneuverings are fascinating in their own right, the conclusion leads to an even more fascinating technology discussion – how did the FBI crack the iPhone, and what are the implications of this successful hack? Continue reading