A Decade in Legal Tech – 5 Surprises

Travel back in time to 2010. What was appended to your hand back then? A BlackBerry?  Perhaps the least anticipated change in legal is the decline in usage – to nearly zero – of the BlackBerry smartphone. I was rarely separated from my CrackBerry. It changed everything. Always connected. 

Here’s my take on five changes in legal tech in the last decade.  One caveat, I work mainly with documents, email, mobility, and security. Therefore, I see just a sliver of legal tech. You surely have seen others.

BlackBerry and iPhone 11 Smart Phones

1. BlackBerry ⬇️…iPhone #1

In 2011, 40% of attorneys responding to the ABA Tech Survey used BlackBerries. 

Here are the ABA 2018 Technology Survey data on smartphone usage by lawyers:

  • iOS – 68%
  • Android – 25%
  • BlackBerry – 2%
  • Windows – 1%
  • None – 5%

2. The Cloud ☁️

Even as recently as 5 years ago, the mention of the Cloud drew major push-back at law firms. NetDocuments led the way in legal. NetDocuments is in their 20th year. The most famous SaaS company, Salesforce.com, was founded in 1999. NetDocuments was truly a pioneer, now experiencing tremendous growth. In addition, we have seen surprising Office 365 adoption at law firms in the past two years. 

3. iManage’s management buyout from HP

From Interwoven to Autonomy to HP, iManage wound up as niche product in a bloated company. They escaped not a minute too soon. It’s been an impressive turnaround. 

4. Face🧑🏼‍ ID & Touch 🤚🏼ID 

Security and usability are often at loggerheads. Biometric authentication has satisfied both.

5. Edit a document without a PC 💻

Word may be second only to Outlook email as the tool most frequently used by lawyers. 

These two products made it possible: 

Looking back, what surprising developments have you seen in past decade in legal tech?

Happy Holidays!

-Maureen

Working While Mobile

Unsplash: Joren Frielink

Unsplash: Joren Frielink

Mobility in the enterprise has taken off and it’s headed in only one direction. I’ve read the hand-wringing in the press about the lagging adoption of enterprise mobility. I suppose that it makes for provocative headlines. But that’s not what we are experiencing in our business as an enterprise mobility solutions provider. We see professional services organizations moving forward with requirements, timelines, and budget.

They can’t wait any longer. The business demands it.

Beyond Email, At Last

For years the concern has been that enterprise mobility had not moved beyond Email, Contacts, and Calendar. Fortunately, a couple of leading enterprise software companies have shared their real-world data and colorful charts. Let’s take a look at the data.

Good Technology’s “Mobility Index Report” for Q2 2015 shows that their typical customer has deployed 3.43 apps in addition to Email.

Good Technology Apps Beyond Email Q2 2015

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My Favorite Reads of the Week

Each week I post a few of my fave reads related to tech and business. This week: addictive apps, being a minority in tech, what you owe your employer, and why some workers don’t love BYOD.

VW bus

Why Your Workers Hate BYOD

Hoping to get away without sharing your location with your law firm IT department? Using a health-related app on your personal smartphone? Device management by employers is getting some backlash. Tom Kaneshige, @kaneshige, writing in CIO.com, explores these concerns with BYOD. Disclosure: our Mobile Helix Link mobile app does not track employee movements or capture information regarding personal apps.

Five Things You Owe Your Employer – And Five You Don’t

Liz Ryan, @humanworkplace, CEO and founder of Human Workplace, with some solid pointers. For example, you do owe your integrity; you don’t owe your soul.

The Other Side of Diversity

A sobering narrative of Erica Joy’s career moving from “a young black lady to a black woman in the predominantly white male tech industry.” From Alaska to the San Francisco Bay area and points in-between.

Why Messaging Apps are So Addictive

Who doesn’t want to build a habit forming app? Nir Eyal, @nireyal, author of Hooked: How to Build Habit Forming Products, outlines how hooks work in apps. This is good stuff.

–Maureen, @mobilehelix